News

  • March SELMA focus: Hacking into the head of a hater

    March SELMA focus: Hacking into the head of a hater

    As part of our efforts to hack online hate, SELMA partners are preparing a European awareness week against online hate speech, which will take place in October 2019. It will be a week full of actions aimed to share our response to online hate with different stakeholders and engage them in our activities.

  • Hate speech in the UK: a close legal link with hate crime

    UK national perspective on hate speech

    Online hate speech in the UK, as well as efforts to address it, must be understood within the broader context of hate crime. As stated on its official website, The Crown Prosecution Service (CPS) defines hate crime as "a range of criminal behaviour where the perpetrator is motivated by hostility or demonstrates hostility towards the victim's disability, race, religion, sexual orientation or transgender identity." While hate crime is not a new phenomenon in the UK, there have been concerns about rising levels in recent years.

  • Hate speech in Greece: legal and educational measures against the rhetoric of hatred

    Greek national perspective on hate speech

    In the second half of the 20th century, the Greek law introduced different limitations of expression to protect citizens from national, racial, ethnic or religious discrimination, hatred or violence. In 2014, the so called "anti-racist law" (4285/2014) broadened the definition basis for the crime of racism, xenophobia and colour-based discrimination, to also include gender, sexual orientation, gender identity and disability.

  • Hacking Online Hate: Building an Evidence Base for Educators

    Hacking Online Hate: Building an Evidence Base for Educators

    The SELMA project has published "Hacking Online Hate: Building an Evidence Base for Educators," a research report that synthesises the main findings of a comprehensive research aiming to achieve a holistic understanding of the online hate speech phenomenon. The research, carried out by professionals with a variety of academic and organisation backgrounds, comprises three interrelated components enriching each other: a literature review, a series of qualitative focus groups and an online quantitative survey.

  • Hate speech in Germany: a controversial law without a legal definition of the term

    German national perspective on hate speech

    Online hate speech is a well-known phenomenon in Germany. A recent survey study conducted among a representative sample of German Internet users demonstrated that 78 per cent of participants have already witnessed hate speech online. Especially young people between 14 and 24 years old are, on average, more often exposed to online hate speech than other age groups, according to the study Forsa-Befragung zur Wahrnehmung von Hassrede im Internet. Despite the pervasiveness of the phenomenon in Germany, to date, there is no overarching definition of the term "Hate Speech."